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FCC Finally Orders ISPs To Say Exactly Where They Offer Broadband

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pt, 2019-08-02 03:25
The FCC voted today to collect more accurate data about which parts of the U.S. have broadband and which parts lack high-speed connectivity. "From now on, home Internet providers will have to give the FCC geospatial maps of where they provide service instead of merely reporting which census blocks they offer service in," reports Ars Technica. From the report: The FCC's current broadband mapping system has serious limitations. The Form 477 data-collection program that requires ISPs to report census-block coverage lets an ISP count an entire census block as served even if it can serve just one home in the block. There are millions of census blocks across the US, and each one generally contains between 600 and 3,000 people. Perhaps even worse, ISPs can count a census block as served in some cases where they don't provide any broadband in the block. That's because the FCC tells ISPs to report where they could offer service "without an extraordinary commitment of resources." An ISP could thus count a census block as served if it's near its network facilities, but in practice ISPs have charged homeowners tens of thousands of dollars for line extensions. Pai's mapping order (full text) says it "will collect geospatial broadband coverage maps from Internet service providers," and create a crowdsourcing system to collect public input on the accuracy of ISP-submitted maps. ISPs could still count homes that aren't currently connected to their networks, but the FCC has tightened the criteria for doing so. ISPs may only count an area as served if the ISP "has a current broadband connection or it could provide such a connection within ten business days of a customer request and without an extraordinary commitment of resources or construction costs exceeding an ordinary service activation fee." The new requirements are limited to fixed broadband providers, those that offer non-mobile service in homes and businesses.

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An AI System Should Be Recognized As the Inventor of Two Ideas In Patents Filed On Its Behalf, Academics Say

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pt, 2019-08-02 02:45
An anonymous reader quotes a report from the BBC An artificial intelligence system should be recognized as the inventor of two ideas in patents filed on its behalf, a team of academics says. The AI has designed interlocking food containers that are easy for robots to grasp and a warning light that flashes in a rhythm that is hard to ignore. Patents offices insist innovations are attributed to humans -- to avoid legal complications that would arise if corporate inventorship were recognized. The academics say this is "outdated." And it could see patent offices refusing to assign any intellectual property rights for AI-generated creations. As a result, two professors from the University of Surrey have teamed up with the Missouri-based inventor of Dabus AI to file patents in the system's name with the relevant authorities in the UK, Europe and US. Dabus is designed to develop new ideas, which is "traditionally considered the mental part of the inventive act," according to creator Stephen Thaler. Law professor Ryan Abbott told BBC News: "These days, you commonly have AIs writing books and taking pictures - but if you don't have a traditional author, you cannot get copyright protection in the US. So with patents, a patent office might say, 'If you don't have someone who traditionally meets human-inventorship criteria, there is nothing you can get a patent on.' In which case, if AI is going to be how we're inventing things in the future, the whole intellectual property system will fail to work." He suggested an AI should be recognized as being the inventor and whoever the AI belonged to should be the patent's owner, unless they sold it on.

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NYPD Adds Children As Young As 11 To Facial Recognition Database

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pt, 2019-08-02 02:03
"The New York Police Department (NYPD) has been loading thousands of arrest photos of children and teenagers into a facial recognition database despite evidence the technology has a higher risk of false matches in younger faces," reports The New York Times. Some of the children included in the database are as young as 11, but most are teenagers between 13 and 16 years old. From the report: Elected officials and civil rights groups said the disclosure that the city was deploying a powerful surveillance tool on adolescents -- whose privacy seems sacrosanct and whose status is protected in the criminal justice system -- was a striking example of the Police Department's ability to adopt advancing technology with little public scrutiny. Several members of the City Council as well as a range of civil liberties groups said they were unaware of the policy until they were contacted by The New York Times. Police Department officials defended the decision, saying it was just the latest evolution of a longstanding policing technique: using arrest photos to identify suspects. The New York Police Department can take arrest photos of minors as young as 11 who are charged with a felony, depending on the severity of the charge. And in many cases, the department keeps the photos for years, making facial recognition comparisons to what may have effectively become outdated images. There are photos of 5,500 individuals in the juvenile database, 4,100 of whom are no longer 16 or under, the department said. Teenagers 17 and older are considered adults in the criminal justice system. Civil rights advocates say that including their photos in a facial recognition database runs the risk that an imperfect algorithm identifies them as possible suspects in later crimes. A mistaken match could lead investigators to focus on the wrong person from the outset, they said.

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FTC Antitrust Probe of Facebook Scrutinizes Its Acquisitions

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2019-08-01 22:05
The Federal Trade Commission is examining Facebook's acquisitions as part of its antitrust investigation into the social-media giant -- to determine if they were part of a campaign to snap up potential rivals before they could become a threat [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled; alternative source], WSJ reported Thursday, citing people familiar with the matter. From the report: The company's acquisition practices are a central component of the FTC probe, the people said. Facebook disclosed the FTC's antitrust investigation in its earnings announcement last week, but provided few details. FTC investigators are looking for evidence on whether Facebook and founder Mark Zuckerberg purchased startup technology firms to keep them from challenging Facebook's empire, the people said. The FTC has begun reaching out to people who founded companies that Facebook purchased, some of the people said.

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A New Bill Aims To Protect US Voters From the Next Cambridge Analytica

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2019-08-01 18:05
As the 2020 campaign season accelerates, a US lawmaker introduced a bill on Thursday that would regulate how political parties use voters' data in federal elections. rrconan writes: Democratic senator Dianne Feinstein said the bill, the Voter Privacy Act, is the first to directly respond to Cambridge Analytica, which used Facebook to harvest the data of 87 million voters, often without permission, in hopes of influencing their behavior. In fact, this was just one of many data operations ongoing in the world of US elections. Massive collections of data: In 2017, the Republican National Committee accidentally exposed political data on more than 198 million US citizens. The incident highlighted the technical challenges of protecting sensitive data troves online, as well as the enormous collections of information the Republican Party has gathered in an effort to win the next vote. While legislators around the world have zeroed in on how industry uses personal data, there is no American law governing the collection and use of voter data in politics.

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California Police Are Sharing Facial Recognition Databases To ID Suspects

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2019-08-01 16:44
Many of California's local law enforcement agencies have access to facial recognition software for identifying suspects who appear in crime scene footage, documents obtained through public records requests show. From a report: Three California counties also have the capability to run facial recognition searches on each others' mug shot databases, and others could join if they choose to opt into a network maintained by a private law enforcement software company. The network is called California Facial Recognition Interconnect, and it's a service offered by DataWorks Plus, a Greenville, South Carolina-based company with law enforcement contracts in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco, Sacramento, and Santa Barbara. Currently, the three adjacent counties of Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino are able to run facial recognition against mug shots in each other's databases. That means these police departments have access to about 11.7 million mug shots of people who have previously been arrested, a majority of which come from the Los Angeles system.

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Cisco To Pay $8.6 Million Fine For Selling Hackable Surveillance Tech

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2019-08-01 03:25
Cisco has agreed to pay $8.6 million to settle a claim that it sold video surveillance software it knew was vulnerable to hackers to hospitals, airports, schools, state governments and federal agencies. SFGate reports: The tech giant continued to sell the software and didn't fix the massive security weakness for about four years after a whistleblower alerted the company about it in 2008, according to a settlement unsealed Wednesday with the Justice Department and 15 states as well as the District of Columbia. Hackers could use the flaw not just to spy on video footage but to turn surveillance cameras on and off, delete footage and even potentially compromise other connected physical security systems such as alarms or locks - all without being detected, according to Hamsa Mahendranathan, an attorney at Constantine Cannon, which represented whistleblower James Glenn. The settlement marks the first time a company has been forced to pay out under a federal whistleblower law for not having adequate cybersecurity protections.

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Cambridge, Massachusetts Moves To Ban Facial Recognition

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2019-08-01 01:30
Citing threats to free speech and civil rights, the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts on Tuesday moved to prohibit local government from using facial recognition. Three other cities in the country have already instituted such bans over concerns that the technology is biased and violates basic human rights. Gizmodo reports: In December of last year, the Cambridge City Council passed the Surveillance Technology Ordinance which requires the council's approval prior to the acquisition or deployment of certain surveillance tech, which included facial recognition software. The order was passed on Tuesday by the council and will next be sent to the Public Safety Committee, Mayor Marc McGovern and Councillor Sumbul Siddiqui both confirmed to Gizmodo in an email. This marks one step closer to banning the city's use of the tech altogether. The amendment, sponsored by Cambridge Mayor Marc McGovern and two city councilmembers, argued that, given recent reports, it's evident this tech can discriminate against women and people of color. They also argued that facial recognition technology violates a person's civil rights and civil liberties. "The use of face recognition technology can have a chilling effect on the exercise of constitutionally protected free speech, with the technology being used in China to target ethnic minorities, and in the United States, it was used by police agencies in Baltimore, Maryland, to target activists in the aftermath of Freddie Gray's death," the amendment states.

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Everything Cops Say About Amazon's Ring Is Scripted Or Approved By Ring

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2019-08-01 00:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: Amazon's home security company Ring has garnered enormous control over the ways in which its law enforcement partners are allowed to portray its products, going as far as to review and even author statements attributed to police in the press, according to emails and documents obtained by Gizmodo. This summer, Ring even urged a Florida police department to delay announcing its partnership with the company for weeks, telling officials that it preferred to keep the spotlight on a separate initiative launched by the city, designed to incentivize the purchase of its home surveillance products. Because there are already thousands of Ring users in major cities across the U.S., one of Ring's primary goals in its police partnerships is encouraging existing customers to download Neighbors. To ensure that police stay on message when promoting the app, or answering questions about it, Ring not only provides police departments with talking points but widely seeks to secure contracts that grant it the absolute right to approve all police statements about its services. Contracts and other documents obtained from police departments in three states show that Ring pre-writes almost all of the messages shared by police across social media, and attempts to legally obligate police to give the company final say on all statements about its products, even those shared with the press. (In exchange, police are also given the ability to approve any Ring press releases that directly reference the partnering police agency.) Ring's so-called "press packets" to partnering agencies include a "Press Release Template," "Social Media Templates," and "Key Talking Points," as well as high-resolution Ring and Neighbors App logos "to incorporate with PR materials as needed." Furthermore, according to Gizmodo, "the packets are accompanied by instructions dictating that final drafts of public remarks must be sent to Ring so that the company's PR team can 'review and sign off' before they're sent to local news outlets." Motherboard recently reported that Ring has partnered with 200 law enforcement agencies across the U.S.

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FTC Says 'You Will Be Disappointed' if You Choose $125 For Equifax Payout

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2019-07-31 21:30
The Federal Trade Commission said today there's been "overwhelming" interest in a settlement agreement with Equifax, and that consumers looking for a previously announced payout of up to $125 may be disappointed. From a report: The agency said this month that it had reached a $700 million agreement with the credit reporting agency over a massive breach of private data in 2017. As part of the settlement, consumers whose data was compromised could request up to $125 or free credit monitoring services. The potential for a quick payout generated major interest, but only $31 million of the settlement was set aside for cash payouts, meaning each payout could be far smaller than $125, depending on how many people request one. In a blog post today, the FTC tempered expectations. "A large number of claims for cash instead of credit monitoring means only one thing: each person who takes the money option will wind up only getting a small amount of money," the agency said. "Nowhere near the $125 they could have gotten if there hadn't been such an enormous number of claims filed."

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Major Broadcasters Sue TV Streaming Nonprofit Locast

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2019-07-31 18:45
Four major broadcast networks have filed a lawsuit against Locast, a New York-based nonprofit that streams local broadcast programming over the internet. From a report: In their lawsuit, ABC, CBS, NBC Universal and Fox allege that Locast violates their copyright by retransmitting their programming without permission, likening it to Aereo, the TV retransmission startup that shut down in 2014 as the result of a similar lawsuit. "Locast is simply Aereo 2.0, a business built on illegally using broadcaster content," the lawsuit reads in part. "While it pretends to be a public service without any commercial purpose, Locast's marketing and deep connections to AT&T and Dish make clear that it exists to serve its pay-tv patrons." Locast responded to the lawsuit Wednesday morning with the following statement: "Locast is an independent, non-profit organization that provides a public service retransmitting free over-the-air broadcasts. Its activities are expressly permitted under the Copyright Act. The fact that no broadcasters have previously filed suit for more than a year and a half suggests that they recognize this. We look forward to defending the claims -- and the public's right to receive transmissions broadcast over the airwaves -- in the litigation." Further reading: Locast, a Free App Streaming Network TV, Would Love to Get Sued.

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'The White House Blocked My Report on Climate Change and National Security'

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2019-07-31 18:05
Dr. Rod Schoonover, who until recently served as a senior analyst in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research at the State Department, writing for The New York Times: Ten years ago, I left my job as a tenured university professor to work as an intelligence analyst for the federal government, primarily in the State Department but with an intervening tour at the National Intelligence Council. My focus was on the impact of environmental and climate change on national security, a growing concern of the military and intelligence communities. It was important work. Two words that national security professionals abhor are uncertainty and surprise, and there's no question that the changing climate promises ample amounts of both. I always appreciated the apolitical nature of the work. Our job in the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research was to generate intelligence analysis buttressed by the best information available, without regard to political considerations. And although I was uncomfortable with some policies of the Trump administration, no one had ever tried to influence my work or conclusions. That changed last month, when the White House blocked the submission of my bureau's written testimony on the national security implications of climate change to the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. The stated reason was that the scientific foundation of the analysis did not comport with the administration's position on climate change. After an extended exchange between officials at the White House and the State Department, at the 11th hour I was permitted to appear at the hearing and give a five-minute summary of the 11-page testimony. However, Congress was deprived of the full analysis, including the scientific baseline from which it was drawn. Perhaps most important, this written testimony on a critical topic was never entered into the official record.

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University of California Sues Five Major Retailers Over Edison-Style LED Bulbs

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2019-07-31 09:00
The University of California is suing five major retailers, including Amazon, Walmart, Target, IKEA, and Bed Bath & Beyond, for infringing on four patents related to "filament" LED light bulbs. Reuters reports: These patents relate to what the university called the "reinvention of the light bulb" by researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara led by professor Shuji Nakamura, who won the 2014 Nobel prize for physics. The university is seeking unspecified damages, including royalties, in lawsuits filed with the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, and wants the retailers to enter license agreements. It has also asked the U.S. International Trade Commission to open a probe into the retailers' conduct, saying the retailers have failed to require their suppliers to honor the university's patents. Filament LED light bulbs are sometimes called "Edison" or "vintage" bulbs because they resemble light bulbs created by Thomas Edison that have glowing filaments visible inside. According to the university's lawyers at Nixon Peabody, the litigation is the first-of-its-kind "direct patent enforcement" campaign against an entire industry. The university said it was intended "to spearhead a broader, national response to the existential threat" posed by the "widespread disregard" for the patent rights of universities, including when schools encourage the private sector to develop commercial products containing their research.

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DoorDash Tip-Skimming Scheme Prompts Class-Action Lawsuit Seeking All Those Tips That Didn't Go To Drivers

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2019-07-31 00:02
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: DoorDash's years-long scheme to use customer tips to subsidize its workers' wages is finally catching up to the company. And hot on the heels of renewed outrage about its tip-shaving scheme, a new class-action lawsuit is taking aim at the company for misleading its customers about how their tips were used. The suit, filed this week in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York on behalf of Brooklyn resident Alan Arkin and "others similarly situated," claims that that DoorDash failed to make clear to its customers that tips they gave through its app to couriers were not being allocated as they were intended to be, and that had customers known this, they would not have tipped through the app. The suit defines a member of the class as someone who has "used DoorDash and paid a tip through the Door Dash app within the statutory period." "DoorDash has engaged in unlawful and deceptive acts, practices and misconduct by misleading Plaintiff and the consuming public to believe that the tip amount entered on the DoorDash app would be received as a tip by the DoorDash delivery workers for their service," the filing states. "DoorDash knew, and failed to disclose, that the tip amount entered by Plaintiff and other consumers on the app was received by DoorDash, in whole or in part, and used to subsidize its cost of doing business." Gizmodo explains the tipping policy that got DoorDash in hot water: "Through a system introduced in 2017, DoorDash can pay as little as $1 per delivery to a worker depending on the amount that a customer tips on the order. This system promises a guaranteed earning, for example, $8, that the dasher will make on a delivery. If a customer does not tip, DoorDash will pay out $1 plus the remaining $7 it takes to make up that promised wage. However, if a customer does tip, their money will be used to subsidize the worker's guaranteed pay. In other words, customers are essentially paying DoorDash -- not the delivery worker -- with their tip." DoorDash CEO Tony Xu said last week that the company would change its policy, but didn't get into specifics.

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New Bill Would Ban Autoplay Videos and Endless Scrolling

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2019-07-30 20:01
A new bill, sponsored by Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO), targets snapstreaks, YouTube autoplay, and endless scrolling that, the bill alleges, are designed in a way to make services "addictive." Reader Zorro writes: Hawley's Social Media Addiction Reduction Technology Act, or the SMART Act, would ban these features that work to keep users on platforms longer, along with others, like Snapstreaks, that incentivize the continued use of these products. If approved, the Federal Trade Commission and Health and Human Services could create similar rules that would expire after three years unless Congress codified them into law. "Big tech has embraced a business model of addiction," Hawley said. "Too much of the 'innovation' in this space is designed not to create better products, but to capture more attention by using psychological tricks that make it difficult to look away." Deceptive design played an enormous part in last week's FTC settlement with Facebook, and Hawley's bill would make it unlawful for tech companies to use dark patterns to manipulate users into opting into services. For example, "accept" and "decline" checkboxes would need to be the same font, color, and size to help users make better, more informed choices. "Social media companies deploy a host of tactics designed to manipulate users in ways that undermines their wellbeing," said Josh Golin, executive director of campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood.

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Called ID App Truecaller Pushes Software Fix After Covertly Signing Up Indians To Its Payments Service

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2019-07-30 17:26
Truecaller, a service that helps users screen robocalls, has rolled out an update to its app in India, its largest market, after a previous software release covertly signed up an unspecified number of users to its payments service. From a report: A number of users in India began to complain late Monday that Truecaller, which has amassed over 100 million daily users in the country, had registered them to its payments service without their consent. In a statement to TechCrunch, Truecaller acknowledged the error and said a bug in the previous software update caused the issue. The bug led the app to quietly send a text message to a bank to verify their account -- which is part of the procedure to sign up to the payments service.

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Capital One's Breach Was Inevitable, Because We Did Nothing After Equifax

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2019-07-30 16:07
An anonymous reader shares a report: Another day, another massive data breach. This time it's the financial giant and credit card issuer Capital One, which revealed on Monday a credit file breach affecting 100 million Americans and 6 million Canadians. Sound familiar? It should. Just last week, credit rating giant Equifax settled for more than $575 million over a date breach it had -- and hid from the public for several months -- two years prior. Why should we be surprised? Equifax faced zero fallout until its eventual fine. All talk, much bluster, but otherwise little action. Equifax's chief executive Richard Smith "retired" before he was fired, allowing him to keep his substantial pension packet. Lawmakers grilled the company but nothing happened. An investigation launched by the former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the governmental body responsible for protecting consumers from fraud, declined to pursue the company. The FTC took its sweet time to issue its fine -- which amounted to about 20% of the company's annual revenue for 2018. For one of the most damaging breaches to the U.S. population since the breach of classified vetting files at the Office of Personnel Management in 2015, Equifax got off lightly. Legislatively, nothing has changed. Equifax remains as much of a "victim" in the eyes of the law as it was before -- technically, but much to the ire of the millions affected who were forced to freeze their credit as a result.

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Amazon's Ring Reportedly Partners With 200 Law Enforcement Agencies

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2019-07-30 15:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: At least 200 law enforcement agencies around the country have entered into partnerships with Amazon's home surveillance company Ring, according to an email obtained by Motherboard via public record request. Ring has never disclosed the exact number of partnerships that it maintains with law enforcement. However, the company has partnered with at least 200 law enforcement agencies, according to notes taken by a police officer during a Ring webinar, which he emailed to himself in April. It's possible that the number of partnerships has changed since the day the email was sent. The officer who sent the email told Motherboard that the email was a transcribed version of handwritten notes that he took during a team webinar with a Ring representative on April 9. Additional emails obtained by Motherboard indicate that this webinar trained officers on how to use the "Law Enforcement Neighborhood Portal." This portal allows local police to see a map with the approximate locations of all Ring cameras in a neighborhood, and request footage directly from camera owners. Owners need to consent, but police do not need a warrant to ask for footage. "This doesn't surprise me at all, and it's the perfect example of how corporate surveillance and government surveillance are inextricably linked," Evan Greer, deputy director of Fight for the Future, told Motherboard. "Amazon is building a for-profit surveillance dragnet and partnering with local law enforcement agencies in ways that avoid any form of oversight or accountability that police departments might normally be required to adhere to." "It's time to come to grips with the fact that the 1984 dystopian future we all fear isn't something a future authoritarian government might impose," Greer told Motherboard, "it's something that's being built right now, in plain sight, through partnerships between private companies and government agencies."

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Capital One Says Hacker Breached Accounts of 100 Million People; Ex-Amazon Employee Arrested

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2019-07-30 07:18
CaptainDork shares a report from Forbes: Capital One said Monday that sensitive financial information -- including social security and bank account numbers -- from over 100 million people were exposed in a massive data breach that led to the arrest of former Amazon employee Paige Thompson, a hacker who lives in Seattle. The information was taken from credit card applications submitted to the Virginia-based bank from 2005-2019. These included names, addresses, zip codes/postal codes, phone numbers, email addresses, dates of birth and self-reported income. Additionally, Capital One said that 140,000 Social Security and 80,000 linked bank account numbers were compromised as well as fragments of transaction data from a total of 23 days during 2016, 2017 and 2018. No credit card account numbers or log-in credentials were exposed. Individuals whose information was compromised in the breach will be notified by Capital One. According to court documents, Paige Thompson was arrested for hacking into cloud computer servers rented by Capital One. Investigators say Thompson previously worked at the cloud computing company whose servers were breached, but did not name the company. "Thompson's resume, which is still online, and her LinkedIn profile indicate that she worked at Amazon, which operates the popular cloud computing business Amazon Web Services, from 2015-2016," reports Forbes. "Thompson allegedly posted the information from the hack on her Github profile, which included a link to her resume, leading the FBI to her. The hack occurred on March 22 or 23, the court documents say, but no one at Capital One knew the bank had been breached until four months later when an anonymous security researcher alerted them."

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CBS News Investigation Finds Fraudulent Court Orders Used To Change Google Search Results

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2019-07-30 03:45
A CBS News investigation found that some companies that are hired to make negative web pages disappear appear to be forging judges' signatures to trick Google into changing its search results. From the report: One of the only ways to get Google to permanently remove a link from its search results is with a court order from a judge. CBS News sorted through thousands of these court orders and spotted small businesses from all across America trying to clean up their reputations. But we also spotted a problem: Dozens of the court documents were fakes. "It never even crossed my mind that people would have the guts to actually go out there and just forge a court document," said Eugene Volokh, a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, who specializes in internet law. Volokh points out that forging a court document is criminal. "Part of it is just how brazen it is. They take a judge's signature and they copy it from one order to another order and they pretend something is a court order. It's cheaper and it's faster -- if they don't get caught," Volokh said. CBS News worked with Volokh and identified more than 60 fraudulent court orders sent to Google. Some are obviously fake, like one with a case number of "1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9." Others are more sophisticated, and appear to be drawn from nine different federal courts across the country. The most recent fake court document we identified was submitted in April. It's not just about making a bad review of a local restaurant disappear. CBS News uncovered bogus court documents submitted on behalf of two convicted criminals who wanted Google to forget about their crimes. Both were child sex offenders. Of the more than 60 phony documents, we found that 11 had signatures forged from judges in Hamilton County, Ohio.

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