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AT&T Is Doing Exactly What It Told Congress It Wouldn't Do With Time Warner

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2020-02-06 15:00
schwit1 quotes a report from Ars Technica: AT&T's decision to prevent Time Warner-owned shows from streaming on Netflix and other non-AT&T services reduced the company's quarterly revenue by $1.2 billion, a sacrifice that AT&T is making to give its planned HBO Max service more exclusive content. AT&T took the $1.2-billion hit despite previously telling Congress that it would not restrict distribution of Time Warner content, claiming that would be "irrational business behavior." AT&T's actual Q4 2019 revenue was $46.8 billion, but the company said it would have been $48 billion if not for "HBO Max investments in the form of foregone WarnerMedia content licensing revenues." An AT&T spokesperson told Ars that the $1.2 billion in lost revenue was primarily caused by the decision "not to sell existing content -- mainly Friends, The Big Bang Theory, and Fresh Prince -- to third parties such as Netflix." As we've previously reported, AT&T took Time Warner shows off Netflix in order to give the exclusive streaming rights to AT&T's HBO Max, which is scheduled to debut in May 2020 for $14.99 a month. The amount of forgone revenue could grow in future quarters, as Friends just left Netflix on January 1. The Big Bang Theory and Fresh Prince were not on Netflix in the United States, so in those cases the forgone revenue is apparently from not entering into licensing deals instead of ending them. AT&T also pulled Pretty Little Liars off Netflix in mid-2019 in order to give HBO Max the exclusive streaming rights.

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Welfare Surveillance System Violates Human Rights, Dutch Court Rules

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2020-02-06 02:45
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: A Dutch court has ordered the immediate halt of an automated surveillance system for detecting welfare fraud because it violates human rights, in a judgment likely to resonate well beyond the Netherlands. The case was seen as an important legal challenge to the controversial but growing use by governments around the world of artificial intelligence (AI) and risk modeling in administering welfare benefits and other core services. Campaigners say such "digital welfare states" -- developed often without consultation, and operated secretively and without adequate oversight -- amount to spying on the poor, breaching privacy and human rights norms and unfairly penalizing the most vulnerable. A Guardian investigation in October found the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) had increased spending to about $10 million a year on a specialist "intelligent automation garage" where computer scientists were developing more than 100 welfare robots, deep learning and intelligent automation for use in the welfare system. The Dutch government's risk indication system (SyRI) is a risk calculation model developed over the past decade by the social affairs and employment ministry to predict the likelihood of an individual committing benefit or tax fraud or violating labour laws. Deployed primarily in low-income neighborhoods, it gathers government data previously held in separate silos, such as employment, personal debt and benefit records, and education and housing histories, then analyses it using a secret algorithm to identify which individuals might be at higher risk of committing benefit fraud. "A broad coalition of privacy and welfare rights groups, backed by the largest Dutch trade union, argued that poor neighborhoods and their inhabitants were being spied on digitally without any concrete suspicion of individual wrongdoing," the report adds. "SyRI was disproportionately targeting poorer citizens, they said, violating human rights norms." "The court ruled that the SyRI legislation contained insufficient safeguards against privacy intrusions and criticized a 'serious lack of transparency' about how it worked. It concluded in its ruling that, in the absence of more information, the system may, in targeting poor neighborhoods, amount to discrimination on the basis of socioeconomic or migrant status."

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Split Senate Acquits Trump of Impeachment Charges

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Cz, 2020-02-06 01:00
The Senate on Wednesday acquitted President Donald Trump on two articles of impeachment, rejecting the House's charges that he should be removed from office for abusing his power and obstructing the congressional investigation into his conduct. Politico reports: The vote capped a frenetic four-month push by House Democrats to investigate and impeach Trump for allegedly withholding U.S. military aid from Ukraine to pressure its leaders to investigate his Democratic rivals, including former Vice President Joe Biden. The impeachment articles also charged Trump with obstructing the House's investigation into the matter. The first article, abuse of power, failed 48-52 -- well short of the 67-vote super-majority required to remove Trump from office. Utah Sen. Mitt Romney was the lone Republican to vote in favor of the abuse of power charge. The second article, obstruction of Congress, failed 47-53 -- a party-line vote. All Democratic senators voted to convict Trump on both counts. Chief Justice John Roberts, who presided over just the third presidential impeachment trial in U.S. history, announced the result on each article of impeachment Wednesday afternoon, bringing the three-week trial to a close. "The Senate, having tried Donald Trump, president of the United States, upon two articles of impeachment exhibited against him by the House of Representatives, and two-thirds of the senators present not having found him guilty of the charges contained therein: it is, therefore, ordered and adjudged that the said Donald John Trump be, and he is hereby, acquitted of the charges in said articles," Roberts said.

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Apple Patents Foldable Device With Movable Flaps To Prevent Display From Creasing

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2020-02-05 20:01
Apple this week has been granted a patent for a foldable device with a unique hinge mechanism that utilizes movable flaps to help prevent the display from being creased or damaged when folded. From a report: Published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office today, the patent explains that the hinge mechanism would ensure adequate separation between the first and second portions of the display. When the device is unfolded, movable flaps would extend to cover the gap, and then retract when the device is folded. Early foldable smartphones like Samsung's Galaxy Fold and Huawei's Mate X have noticeable creases along the bending portion of the display. Motorola's new foldable Razr avoids this issue with a unique hinge design, but early reviews indicate the device makes creaking sounds when opened or closed.

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Ireland's Data Privacy Watchdog Opens Probes Into Google, Tinder

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2020-02-05 02:50
Ireland's Data Protection Commission (DPC) has opened two separate GDPR investigations into Google and Tinder. Engadget reports: In the case of [Tinder], the agency says it will examine how the dating app handles people's data and whether it's been transparent about the process. The DPC says it will also look into whether Tinder has been properly meeting data requests from users. Under GDPR, Europeans have several options when it comes to how companies handle their data. They can, for instance, ask an app or service to delete their data. The law also allows people to request copies of their personal information. The investigation into Tinder comes after the Norwegian Consumer Council published a report that accused Tinder, alongside several other dating apps, for irresponsibly spreading sensitive user data. Notably, the DPC says it's opening its investigation into Tinder after it received complaints from people in both Ireland and other parts of the European Union. As for Google, the DPC will investigate how the search giant handles and processes location data. Numerous European consumer rights groups started asking the agency to investigate Google shortly after the EU enacted GDPR. Both Tinder and Google have said they'll cooperate with the probes. CNET notes Google and Tinder could face fines of up to four percent of their total annual revenue in the previous year, if the two companies haven't been fully compliant with GDPR.

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Amazon's Ring Doorbell Update Allows Opt Out of All Police Video Requests

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Śr, 2020-02-05 01:30
Amazon's Ring doorbell has rolled out a new update that lets users add and remove shared users on an account, restrict third-party access, view two-factor authentication settings, and (perhaps, most importantly) opt out of all video request notifications from law enforcement. Mashable reports: Uncovered in reporting by Motherboard and Gizmodo in 2019, the scale of Amazon's Neighbor Portal program is much larger than originally believed -- and its various affiliations with law enforcement has raised alarming ethical questions. In the new update, users will be able to see an "Active Law Enforcement Map" clarifying which local institutions are part of the Neighbor Portal network. They will also be able to disable requests for video from officials, whether or not they have received one in the past. (This feature was available previously, but an account had to have received one request for the opt-out option to appear.) That said, Ring is suggesting users allow video request notifications -- citing specific instances where such evidence helped solve criminal cases. According to Ring's official press release, the control center update will be made available to all Android and iOS users within "the next few days." Per the same release, this is the first of numerous security and privacy updates planned for the system.

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Can Privacy Be Big Business? A Wave of Startups Thinks So.

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2020-02-04 21:30
California helped create the modern Big Data industry, in which tech companies vacuum up and profit off personal information. Now a new law in the state is creating something like a solution to the loss of privacy. From a report: The California Consumer Privacy Act, which took effect Jan. 1, gives people the right to know what large companies know about them and the right to block the sale of that information to others. In effect, it created a market for privacy expertise and software. A wave of privacy-focused technology startups is offering a variety of services, from personal data scrubbing to business-focused software meant to help companies comply with the law. A brief list of the nearly 300 companies now selling privacy services includes Privacera, Privsee, Privally, Privitar and Privaon. There's DataFleets, DataGrail, DataGravity, Dataguise, DataTrue and Datastream.io. And there's HITRUST, Mighty Trust, OneTrust, trust-hub, TrustArc and The Media Trust, as well as SecureB2B, Securiti.ai, Security Scorecard and Very Good Security. Personal privacy is still under threat from data breaches, data harvesting and elsewhere, but it may also finally be living up to its promise as a profitable business.

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Google May Have Shared Your Videos With Strangers

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2020-02-04 16:01
If you used Google Takeout to download an archive of your Google Photos content, there's a chance that someone else may have ended up with your videos. From a report: The company has admitted that for a few days in November last year, "some videos in Google Photos were exported to unrelated users' archives." This means that not only could your videos have ended up on a stranger's computer, but also that you may have received random videos belonging to someone else. Google is not making much of the "technical issue" which it says has now been resolved. But the company apologizes for the "inconvenience" that may have been caused for people downloading their Google Photos archive between November 21 and 25, 2019.

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FBI Catches Hacker That Stole Nintendo's Secrets For Years

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2020-02-04 15:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A 21-year-old California man has pleaded guilty to hacking Nintendo's servers multiple times since 2016, using phishing techniques to gain early access to information about the company's plans. Ryan S. Hernandez, who went by RyanRocks online, worked with an unnamed associate to phish employee login credentials for proprietary Nintendo servers, according to an indictment filed in Washington state federal court in December and unsealed over the weekend. Hernandez used that unauthorized access to "download thousands of files, including proprietary developer tools and non-public information" about upcoming Nintendo products and "access pirated and unreleased video games." That information (and discussion of Nintendo's internal server vulnerabilities) was leaked to the public via Twitter, Discord, and a chat room called "Ryan's Underground Hangout," prosecutors said. At one point, "RyanRocks" drew at least a little infamy in the Nintendo hacking community for allegedly leaking a Nintendo Software Development Kit that had a piece of hidden Remote Access Tool malware added to it. FBI agents confronted Hernandez about his hacking in 2017, according to a prosecution press release, and secured a promise from Hernandez "to stop any further malicious activity." But the hacking continued in 2018 and 2019, according to the indictment, until a June 2019 FBI raid that obtained hard drives with thousands of proprietary Nintendo files. The seized hard drives also included sexually explicit images of minors in a folder labeled "BAD STUFF," according to prosecutors. Hernandez has agreed to pay almost $260,000 to Nintendo as part of a plea agreement. Prosecutors are recommending a jail term of three years for Hernandez's crimes when sentencing is decided in April.

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Ex-CIA Engineer Set To Go On Trial For Vault 7 Leak

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2020-02-04 05:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from NPR: Manhattan federal prosecutors are poised to open their case Tuesday in the trial of a former software engineer for the Central Intelligence Agency who is charged with handing over a trove of classified information on the spy agency's hacking operations to WikiLeaks (Warning: source paywalled; alternative source). In 2017, WikiLeaks released more than 8,000 pages of secret materials -- which the antisecrecy organization called "Vault 7" -- detailing the CIA's cyberespionage arsenal, including the agency's playbook for hacking smartphones, computer operating systems, messaging applications and internet-connected televisions. It was one of the largest breaches in the agency's history. Federal prosecutors say the defendant, Joshua Schulte, stole the documents when he worked in a CIA unit that designed the hacking tools. Mr. Schulte, 31 years old, faces 11 criminal counts, including illegal gathering and transmission of national defense information -- charges that derive from the Espionage Act, a statute that has been applied in other WikiLeaks cases. Some of the charges relate to Mr. Schulte's alleged misconduct and obstruction following his 2017 arrest -- prosecutors say he lied to law enforcement and disobeyed court orders. Mr. Schulte and his lawyers have called the espionage charges vague and overreaching, saying they infringed on constitutional free-speech rights. They have alleged fatal errors in the government's case, objected to the secrecy shrouding the investigation and protested Mr. Schulte's isolated confinement in a Manhattan jail. Opening arguments in the trial are expected as soon as Tuesday, once jury selection is completed.

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Justice Department Is Meeting State AG Offices Tuesday To Discuss If Google Broke Antitrust Law

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Wt, 2020-02-04 02:10
Justice Department officials will meet on Tuesday with representatives of state attorneys general to discuss their investigations of Google and whether the company broke antitrust law. "The probes focus on search bias, advertising and management of Google's Android operating system," adds Reuters. From the report: The meeting is in the afternoon, according to one source, and will include officials from six or seven states, including Texas, according to a second source familiar with the matter. Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple are all the focus of federal, state and congressional investigations following complaints that the four tech giants abused their clout in dealings with smaller companies. The probes are being carried out by the Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission, state attorneys general and the House Judiciary Committee. U.S. Attorney General William Barr has said he would like to see them wrapped up this year.

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Firefox Now Shows What Telemetry Data It's Collecting About You

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pn, 2020-02-03 23:30
There is now a special page in the Firefox browser where users can see what telemetry data Mozilla is collecting from their browser. From a report: Accessible by typing about:telemetry in the browser's URL address bar, this new section is a recent addition to Firefox. The page shows deeply technical information about browser settings, installed add-ons, OS/hardware information, browser session details, and running processes. The information is what you'd expect a software vendor to collect about users in order to fix bugs and keep a statistical track of its userbase. A Firefox engineer told ZDNet the page was primarily created for selfish reasons, in order to help engineers debug Firefox test installs. However, it was allowed to ship to the stable branch also as a PR move, to put users' minds at ease about what type of data the browser maker collects from its users.

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Researchers Find 'Anonymized' Data Is Even Less Anonymous Than We Thought

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pn, 2020-02-03 22:10
Corporations love to pretend that 'anonymization' of the data they collect protects consumers. Studies keep showing that's not really true. From a report: Last fall, AdBlock Plus creator Wladimir Palant revealed that Avast was using its popular antivirus software to collect and sell user data. While the effort was eventually shuttered, Avast CEO Ondrej Vlcek first downplayed the scandal, assuring the public the collected data had been "anonymized" -- or stripped of any obvious identifiers like names or phone numbers. "We absolutely do not allow any advertisers or any third party...to get any access through Avast or any data that would allow the third party to target that specific individual," Vlcek said. But analysis from students at Harvard University shows that anonymization isn't the magic bullet companies like to pretend it is. Dasha Metropolitansky and Kian Attari, two students at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, recently built a tool that combs through vast troves of consumer datasets exposed from breaches for a class paper they've yet to publish. "The program takes in a list of personally identifiable information, such as a list of emails or usernames, and searches across the leaks for all the credential data it can find for each person," Attari said in a press release. They told Motherboard their tool analyzed thousands of datasets from data scandals ranging from the 2015 hack of Experian, to the hacks and breaches that have plagued services from MyHeritage to porn websites. Despite many of these datasets containing "anonymized" data, the students say that identifying actual users wasn't all that difficult. "An individual leak is like a puzzle piece," Harvard researcher Dasha Metropolitansky told Motherboard. "On its own, it isn't particularly powerful, but when multiple leaks are brought together, they form a surprisingly clear picture of our identities. People may move on from these leaks, but hackers have long memories."

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Kenya's High Court Delays National Biometric ID Program

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pn, 2020-02-03 18:02
Kenya's high court last week temporarily suspended the country's new national biometric identity program until the government enacts laws to protect the security of the data and prevent discrimination against minorities. From a report: The government had said the IDs would be required for all Kenyan citizens and foreign residents to access a broad range of rights and services, including health care, education, public housing, voting, marriage licenses and registering mobile phones. But the court's three-judge panel announced in proceedings on Thursday that it is suspending the digital ID program until the government has in place "an appropriate and comprehensive regulatory framework" that would protect the personal data it collects and safeguard minorities from discrimination. The panel's 500-page judgment is expected to be released this week. The decision is a setback for the government, which had already collected data from nearly 40 million Kenyans during a mass registration in April and May last year. The government will now have to pass new legislation -- under public scrutiny -- to build in protections and implement the biometric program. It is unclear how long that might take.

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PACER Fee Battle Pits Nonprofits, Supporters Against Government

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pn, 2020-02-03 16:41
Three nonprofits will ask the Federal Circuit this week to consider a Goldilocks question: whether fees the government charges to access court records are too high, too low, or just right. From a report: The nonprofits say the fees violate federal law because they're higher than what's needed to operate the system. They represent a certified class of 1.4 million users of the federal judiciary's Public Access to Court Records (PACER) system. The federal court system has come under fire for how it operates PACER, which processed more than 500 million requests for case information last fiscal year. Critics argue the pay system reduces transparency and erodes public trust in the courts. The government argues it's authorized to charge fees that exceed the cost of operating PACER and use the money for other court access projects. A lower court said PACER fees should be "just right," in that they should cover services that provide public access to electronic court information, but not pay for other court technology projects. Both sides appealed to the Federal Circuit. Fees for downloading a copy of a filing run 10 cents per page, up to $3 per document. The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts collected more than $145 million in fees in 2014 alone, according to the complaint.

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Is Amazon Responding to Employee Concerns About 'Ring' Privacy?

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - Pn, 2020-02-03 00:34
"The deployment of connected home security cameras that allow footage to be queried centrally are simply not compatible with a free society," wrote Amazon software developer Max Eliaser (as part of last week's Medium post from "Amazon Employees For Climate Justice.") "The privacy issues are not fixable with regulation and there is no balance that can be struck. Ring should be shut down immediately and not brought back." Inc. columnist Chris Matyszczyk describes what happened next: Amazon released a new control center for Ring. It instituted a few more privacy-conscious settings. One of its new features involves the ability to "opt out of receiving video request notifications when local police seek information related to an investigation." That, to some eyes, may be a start -- or even a swift reaction to Eliaser's comments. Many might want to believe that an employee's strong words could bring some positive reaction. Sadly, this new control center only gives customers the option to opt out, rather than have the default set the other way around. It does, though, at least inform customers which police departments have joined the Ring Neighbors app and therefore are more likely to make requests. Ring did insist that "this is just the beginning. Future versions of Control Center will provide users the ability to view and control even more privacy and security features." The new control center also lets Ring's users see if two-factor authentication is enabled, add and remove Shared Users, and view and remove all devices and third-party services authorized to log into their account. Amazon's blog post about the changes adds that not only security but also privacy "have always been our top priority."

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Fingerprints Can Now Be Dated To Within a Day of When They Were Made

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - So, 2020-02-01 05:30
Writing in Analytical Chemistry, Paige Hinners and Young Jin Lee of Iowa State University say they have figured out an accurate way to data to within 24 hours when a fingerprint under a week old was made -- and thus whether it is associated with a crime temporally, as well as spatially. The Economist reports: They knew from work conducted by other laboratories that the triglyceride oils contained in fingerprints change by oxidation over the course of time. That provides an obvious way to date prints. The problem is that the techniques which have been applied to analyze these oils are able to distinguish age only crudely. In practice, they can determine whether or not a print is over a week old, but nothing else. Dr Hinners and Dr Lee wondered if higher precision could be obtained by thinking a bit more about oxidation. Oxygen molecules in the air come in two varieties. Most have a pair of atoms but some, known as ozone, have three. Though far rarer than diatomic oxygen, ozone is more reactive and also reacts in ways different from those of its two-atomed cousin. The two researchers therefore decided to focus their attentions on ozonolysis, as triatomic oxidation is known. Triglycerides, as their name suggests, are three-tailed molecules. Each tail is a chain of carbon atoms, with hydrogen atoms bonded to the carbons. The chains are held together by bonds between the carbon atoms. These are of two varieties, known as single and double bonds. Single bonds are, in chemistry-speak, saturated, and double bonds unsaturated. By extension, molecules with one or more double bonds in them are also referred to as unsaturated, while those with only single bonds are called saturated. Unsaturated bonds are more reactive, and it is here that ozonolysis does its work. Ozone breaks up triglycerides at their double bonds, with one or more of the ozone's oxygen atoms becoming attached to the carbon chain, to create new chemical species. In principle, this should result in a gradual loss of unsaturated triglycerides and a concomitant rise in the reaction products of ozonolysis. And that, in practice, is what Dr Hinners and Dr Lee found.

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Brexit Happens

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - So, 2020-02-01 02:54
"The UK has officially left the European Union after 47 years of membership," reports the BBC. The historic moment, which happened at 23:00 GMT, was marked by both celebrations and anti-Brexit protests. Candlelit vigils were held in Scotland, which voted to stay in the EU, while Brexiteers partied in London's Parliament Square... Brexit parties were held in pubs and social clubs across the UK as the country counted down to its official departure. Hundreds gathered in Parliament Square to celebrate Brexit, singing patriotic songs and cheering speeches from leading Brexiteers, including Nigel Farage... In Northern Ireland, the campaign group Border Communities Against Brexit staged a series of protests in Armagh, near to the border with the Republic of Ireland. At 2300 GMT, Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon tweeted a picture of the EU flag, adding: "Scotland will return to the heart of Europe as an independent country." The U.K. flag was removed from European Union institutions in Brussels, the BBC notes. And they also quote U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson as saying "For all its strengths and for all its admirable qualities, the EU has evolved over 50 years in a direction that no longer suits this country." "The most important thing to say tonight is that this is not an end but a beginning..."

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Social Media Boosting Service Exposed Thousands of Instagram Passwords

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - So, 2020-02-01 02:02
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: A social media boosting startup, which bills itself as a service to increase a user's Instagram followers, has exposed thousands of Instagram account passwords. The company, Social Captain, says it helps thousands of users to grow their Instagram follower counts by connecting their accounts to its platform. Users are asked to enter their Instagram username and password into the platform to get started. But TechCrunch learned this week Social Captain was storing the passwords of linked Instagram accounts in unencrypted plaintext. Any user who viewed the web page source code on their Social Captain profile page could see their Instagram username and password in plain sight, so long as they had connected their account to the platform. Making matters worse, a website bug allowed anyone access to any Social Captain user's profile without having to log in -- simply plugging in a user's unique account ID into the company's web address would grant access to their Social Captain account -- and their Instagram login credentials. Because the user account IDs were for the most part sequential, it was possible to access any user's account and view their Instagram password and other account information with relative ease. The security researcher who reported the vulnerability provided a spreadsheet of about 10,000 scraped user accounts to TechCrunch. "The spreadsheet contained about 4,700 complete sets of Instagram usernames and passwords," the report says. "The rest of the records contained just the user's name and their email address."

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A New Bill Could Punish Web Platforms For Using End-To-End Encryption

Slashdot - Your Rights Online - So, 2020-02-01 00:40
Lindsey Graham (R-SC) is working on a bill that would reduce legal protections for apps and websites, potentially jeopardizing online encryption. The Verge reports: The draft bill would form a "National Commission on Online Child Exploitation Prevention" to establish rules for finding and removing child exploitation content. If companies don't follow these rules, they could lose some protection under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which largely shields companies from liability over users' posts. Reports from Bloomberg and The Information say that Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) is behind the bill, currently dubbed the Eliminating Abusive and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies (or EARN IT) Act. It would amend Section 230 to make companies liable for state prosecution and civil lawsuits over child abuse and exploitation-related material, unless they follow the committee's best practices. They wouldn't lose Section 230 protections for other content like defamation and threats. The bill doesn't lay out specific rules. But the committee -- which would be chaired by the Attorney General -- is likely to limit how companies encrypt users' data. Large web companies have moved toward end-to-end encryption (which keeps data encrypted for anyone outside a conversation, including the companies themselves) in recent years. Facebook has added end-to-end encryption to apps like Messenger and Whatsapp, for example, and it's reportedly pushing it for other services as well. U.S. Attorney General William Barr has condemned the move, saying it would prevent law enforcement from finding criminals, but Facebook isn't required to comply. Under the EARN IT Act, though, a committee could require Facebook and other companies to add a backdoor for law enforcement.

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